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In the time of Attila

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Published by Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Co. in Boston .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Attila, d. 453 -- Fiction.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Francis Rolt-Wheeler, illustrated by Frank T. Merrill.
GenreFiction.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPZ3.R661 In
The Physical Object
Pagination301 p.
Number of Pages301
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6719101M
LC Control Number28022063
OCLC/WorldCa1692779

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  The book that's got the business world reading, thinking, and quoting. This is the book that reveals the leadership secrets of Attila the Hun-the man who centuries ago shaped an aimless band of mercenary tribal nomads into the undisputed rulers of the ancient world, and who today offers us timeless lessons in win-directed, take-charge by:   Attila: A Barbarian King and the Fall of Rome by John Man pp, Bantam, £ No wonder the Huns went west. It can't have been much fun living in Author: Ranjit Bolt. Leadership Secrets of Attila the Hun is a self-improvement and business leadership book by Wess Roberts. Roberts was a human resource manager at Fireman’s Fund Insurance when he published the book in Using the historical figure of Attila the Hun as his mouthpiece, Roberts outlines his management style and approach to business. I have read this book numerous times and each time one common theme comes to mind, “Leadership at the core is based on the foundation of common-sense solutions to complex situations.” The secrets of Attila the Hun’s leadership lend credence to the fact that ancient leadership problems remain prevalent in contemporary leadership roles.

The book that's got the business world reading, thinking, and quoting. This is the book that reveals the leadership secrets of Attila the Hun-the man who centuries ago shaped an aimless band of mercenary tribal nomads into the undisputed rulers of the ancient world, and who today offers us timeless lessons in win-directed, take-charge management.   E.A Thompson's book entitled "A History of Attila and the Huns" was first published in This is a slightly revised version of that same book, with a different title to make it fit into Wiley-Blackwell's "People of Europe" series. Given the original title, the reign of the Attila is the bulk of this s: Attila (/ ˈ æ t ɪ l ə, ə ˈ t ɪ l ə /; fl. c. –), frequently called Attila the Hun, was the ruler of the Huns from until his death in March He was also the leader of a tribal empire consisting of Huns, Ostrogoths, and Alans among others, in Central and Eastern Europe. During his reign, he was one of the most feared enemies of the Western and Eastern Roman Empires. The Attila School of Management. Attila the Hun is an unlikely subject for the study of leadership. Against all odds, Attila united barbarian hordes into a nation of Huns against. He was driven to accomplish his objectives to the point of executing opponents who stood in the way.

  Attila the Hun was also known as Flagellum Dei, which means the ‘Scourge of God.’ With him at the lead, the Huns were one of the biggest threats faced by the Roman Empire. Although he was famously defeated by the Romans under Flavius Aetius and their Visigothic allies under Theoderic I at the Battle of Catalaunian Plains, Attila the Hun and his warriors were still a threat to the Western. At the time, I had no idea that Albert Lee's complimentary words would eventually bring the book to the attention of a publisher who had faith in its prospects, Warner Books. Thanks, Al! The first step in the process was Dr. Hendrie Weisingei^s suggestion that I send a copy of Leadership Secrets xi LEADERSHIP SECRETS OF ATTILA THE HUN to his. Invasion of Gaul. Attila’s next great campaign was the invasion of Gaul in Hitherto, he appears to have been on friendly terms with the Roman general Aetius, the real ruler of the West at this time, and his motives for marching into Gaul have not been announced that his objective in the West was the kingdom of the Visigoths (a Germanic people who had conquered parts of the. Tension mounted, leading to various incursions south in and , but it wasn’t until that Attila saw his big opportunity following the severe earthquake that destroyed parts of Constantinople’s walls – Attila bludgeoned his way towards the city, sacking and looting as he swarmed south-east, but delaying tactics and Roman building.